FAQs About ExpandShare + Restaurant Ready

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We get lots of questions about why ExpandShare is right for restaurants. Here are a few of the more frequently asked questions we get from restaurant owners and managers:

 

Why is training such a challenge for restaurants?  

There are a couple of reasons.  First, turnover in the foodservice industry is often high, which means you are training new employees all the time.  And in fact, good training can reduce turnover because one of the key reasons employees leave is that they report training as being poor or non-existent.  Also, restaurants are in the service business and are trying to promote a specific concept or model which can only be done through effective training of front line employees.  And in the back of the house, food cost, quality and food safety are all dependent on a well-trained kitchen staff.  

Why eLearning?  Why not do the live training like we are used to?

There is always going to be a hands-on, shoulder-to-shoulder component to restaurant training.  However, much of it can be offloaded to eLearning. Menus, procedures, company culture, rules--all of these can be taught using eLearning.  It’s always on, always the same, always available for when employees need it, right on their phones or computers.  It also costs less than live training, up to 70% less.  And finally, it’s trackable and automated which means you can quickly see who’s trained and who’s not and actually do something about it with just a few clicks.

Why does video work well for training restaurant employees?

Video training is particularly good for restaurant training because you can demonstrate concepts and information.  But it’s also the best way to engage with audiences, with more than 3x the engagement of written text documents and information.  But just putting videos online doesn’t cut it, you need to track it, assess the people watching it and have a training strategy behind it.

What is microlearning?

Microlearning is short eLearning content which is designed to be easily digested by your audience.  Any training which can be taken in just a minute or two is considered microlearning.  Microlearning is perfect for engaging with modern audiences, and it allows people to take training without setting aside hours of their time.  It’s also a great way to do refresher training.

Can I have my employees do training outside of work?

It depends on your company policies and employment rules, but many restaurants would not hesitate to ask an employee to study the menu at home before they come to work--eLearning falls into the same category. We have clients who also require that employees take the training at work, on the clock, and some of them also compensate employees for after-hours coursework.

What the best way to use ExpandShare to maximize my training?

The best training programs are fleshed out over time with more and better content, constantly assessing, tracking and applying the competency of staff to business results.

For onboarding, it’s about having all the bases covered and making sure employees are up to speed. For ongoing training it’s about setting objectives and achieving them.  For example “I want to increase my dessert sales by 10%”.  Implement a training program to teach servers how to upsell desserts, track their knowledge and see if you impact the training results.  The platform gives you all the information and tools to be able to do that.

Can I use ExpandShare to keep already trained users up to speed?

Yes, you can!  You can create campaigns or “Roadmaps” of quizzes and content which can be delivered out over time, automatically.

Can I share resources and documents on ExpandShare?

Yes, that’s one of the primary features of the app--there is a visual library where any user can quickly click and find your key documents, resources, videos and other information.  You can also assign that information to users if you want to make sure they view it.

Is it mobile compatible?

ExpandShare is not just mobile compatible, it’s literally designed from the ground up to be a mobile experience. There are native apps for iOS and Android which support push notifications, but it also works equally well on a mobile browser.  And of course it works well on desktops and laptops too

How will this app help my restaurant make more money?

Here’s a stat for you from a national eLearning research foundation:  42% of companies using eLearning reported an increase in revenue after implementing their programs, and revenue per employee was reported to be 26% higher for companies that offer training using technology.

Where am I going to find the time to put together all this training and content?

We make it easy to get started.  You don’t have to build out a huge training program right away.  First, we include stock content on some key topics like food safety, alcohol safety and sales and upselling.  We also have fully-baked training courses created for positions like hosts and servers and bartenders.  But you can also just upload content that you already have, like, say, a menu or a handbook--then you can add a couple of questions as a quiz, and blast it out to your team.  It takes just a minute to do and you build your set of training content out over time and track it as you go.

Plus if you need extra help, it’s not very expensive for us to help you put together custom courses for your particular needs. We’re very hands-on.  

If you'd like to learn more about ExpandShare + Restaurant Ready, check it out HERE


 

US Foods Helps Restaurants Find Success

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Starting up a restaurant is hard. Running a restaurant is hard. Being successful and realizing the dream of every restaurant owner is even harder. Many owners have grand dreams and a good concept with tasty recipes, but it can be difficult to turn those basic elements into a successful enterprise.

 

Enter US Foods, who has been helping restaurants everywhere be successful. The company has a corps of Restaurant Operations Consultants (ROCs) standing by to help restaurants learn the ins and outs of making great food and making good money doing it. 

There are more than 80 ROCs covering every region in the US. So if you’re a restaurant owner looking for some solid advice, reach out to these folks.  Their services are available to any US Foods customer, and you can reach out to them at the ROC Page on the US Foods site

In addition, US Foods has a set of Value-Added Services partner companies, including every aspect of the industry from scheduling to marketing, liquor control to e-commerce.  These partners help provide the right tools to raise profits and lower costs.

Full disclosure, ExpandShare is one of the Value-Added Services partners, helping restaurants on the training front with our Restaurant Ready software and other tools for restaurants.

If you’re interested in finding out more about the Value-Added Services program, you can find out more on their site.  It’s free to sign up! 

Five Tips on Training Restaurant Employees for Guest Experience

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Exceeding guests’ expectations begins with the culture of you restaurant, which is created by the restaurant managers and the employees themselves. This culture has a huge impact on guests and guest delight.

Here are five tips on creating the best possible environment for delighting guests.

  • Value your team. When employees feel valued, they’re more likely to provide top-notch customer service. In order to get this right, you need to train your managers and then incent them to do things that makes employees feel nurtured and valued.
  • Define who does what. Every team member should know what their responsibilities are and receive training to perform each.
  • Manager to store ratio. If you have multiple locations, keep the management ratio low. It's important for employees to have direct contact with owners and managers as often as possible.
  • Quality is Job 1. Teach everyone what quality means in both service and product. Then make sure everyone is an inspector—make the entire team responsible for quality and give everyone the power to “shut down the line” if the quality is not up to snuff.
  • Service is half the battle. Guests want to be treated well. And they want to be treated well consistently. Put together a model for guest interactions and teach it. Then take the time to make sure that everyone adheres to it—this can take a little while, but is worth the effort. It can be as simple as saying "my pleasure" when someone says "thank you."

One of the best ways to train the standards in any restaurant is to use some simple eLearning.  Find out more about how you can implement eLearning in your restaurant

Take Advantage of eLearning Possibilities in Your Restaurant

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Training is an ongoing process that affects every employee in your establishment. Elearning allows you to provide training in an online format and make it available to all your employees on their devices.

 

However, you'll need both content and a delivery system in order to take advantage of eLearning. Here are some training tasks that eLearning systems can help restaurant managers handle:

First, you can deliver standard training courses on topics like customer service, table service, wine and liquor, handling problems and food safety. The easiest way to get started is to have some stock or standard courses available. You should look for a tool that has this kind of stock content built in.

However, you should plan on creating custom content to either replace or add-to the stock content, so you can train on practices and techniques which are unique to your restaurant.

In addition, you should plan on creating assessments in the form of knowledge checks which reinforce and test users's knowledge. The goal of these assessments is not to weed users out, but to reinforce their knowledge until you are sure they are ready to perform their job at a high level.

These courses should be organized by the different employee roles in your restaurant, like server, host, busser, bartender, dishwasher, etc. Some training information you would want to deliver to all employees, for example, an introduction to the company and its culture. Or how to clock in and clock out.

However, much of the training is specific to different roles and so you will want to be able to assign training to those specific groups of people and verify the performance, both of the group as well as individuals. Any good restaurant eLearning software is going to have reporting capabilities so you can identify and pinpoint any consistent improvement areas.

In addition to the initial "book learning" that restaurant employees need to cover, there are also practical tests, which usually involve shadowing followed by some sort of performance skill check. A good training system will enable this kind of skill check.

And finally, training is a continuous process. Employees need constant refresher training because best practices, menus, processes and information is always changing . In addition, key information can be forgotten or distorted over time, so it's always good to review the fundamentals, especially information that relates to the culture of the organization. Plan to offer regular refresher training to keep your staff up to snuff ongoing.

 

If you're interested, check out ExpandShare's eLearning Services to see how your program can be an epic success.

Why you don't need an LMS

Learning Management Systems. A dreaded software category for most people who need to do eLearning. They're bulky, hard to use, hard to integrate, expensive.  And the cheaper ones just don't do what you really need them to do. 

LMS's have been poorly executed not because the software developers who create them are bad programmers, but rather because it's software that's trying too hard to be "off the shelf".

In many organizations, the whole online learning system has become so convoluted as to be unusable by any but the most dedicated. That's a problem. Unless you plan to have a dedicated resource who is going to do nothing but manage the LMS and its component parts, you should consider a different approach.

Let me explain.

Let's suppose you want to go deep sea fishing—a pretty complicated and expensive endeavor. How do you approach this pursuit? Do you buy a boat, purchase all of the fishing gear and tackle, plot out where you will fish and then set forth to go catch some marlin, ala Ernest Hemingway?

Maybe, if it's really the only thing you have to do.

 

But if not, it's more effective to charter with a captain who already knows the waters, has a ship, all the gear and knows where the best fish are to be found.  

We recommend the latter approach for most companies looking to be effective with their online training efforts. We call it Managed Learning Services.

It's easier and a lot faster to let a third party do the heavy lifting, things like implementing the LMS, building the courses, handling the tech work like audio and video and uploading and file formatting and creating custom reports and on and on. Preferably a company that spends all of their waking hours doing these things. They are going to do it better than you.

Why?  Well in our case, in addition to the experience, we also have developers on staff who have created and implemented learning systems for years. That means we can move very very fast in setting up your site, getting your users set up and your reporting exactly the way you want it.

It also means that we can do integrations like single sign-on and sharing data with other business systems that are all but impossible with off-the-shelf (supposedly) LMS software.

Let me give you an example of the type of advantage I'm talking about, a specific case.

One of our clients wanted to integrate sales data into a training performance report in order to see if there was correlation between sales training and sales results. We put together the technology to import the sales data along with the training data and formatted a report exactly as the client wanted to see it.  That took about three days to turn around.  Try that with your LMS and IT department.

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Here's another one.

We had a client that wanted to show a map of reports from the learning system that showed performance support data from a set of checklists. So we integrated Google Maps and voila, now you can see the reports geographically on a map.  Want those pins to be green intead of red?  No problem.

The list goes on and on. A company that has the capabilities to do custom programming from an existing system architecture, as well as content development and design is a very powerful animal.

Our clients appreciate it because they can focus on things like working with subject matter experts (SMEs), monitoring users, updating content and measuring the effectiveness of the eLearning effort.

If you're interested in offloading some of your online training burden, let us know!

5 Screencasting Tools You Need to Create a Great Microlearning Video

Screencasting software is a necessary addition to any video microlearning toolbox. The ability to capture what's happening on your screen is not only useful for software walkthroughs, but allows you to quickly and easily create simple motion graphics videos using presentation programs like Keynote and PowerPoint.

Why use a Screencast instead of built in video exporters?

Both PowerPoint and Keynote have video export built in, but you should still use a screencasting tool to capture your vids.  Why?  

  • You can capture your voiceover at the same time and control the flow of the program
  • You can easily edit the resulting videos
  • You get additional features like the ability to record video from your webcam at the same time—so your audience gets to see your pretty face too!

There is a wide selection of screencast software out there, both free and paid solutions.  Here are is a list so you can start getting your microlearning video content up and running quickly.

Commercial Software

ScreenFlow by Telestream 

With ScreenFlow you can record any part of your monitor while also capturing your video camera, iOS device, microphone, multi-channel audio device and your computer audio.  It also has a built-in editor which is invaluable if you don't want to use a third-pary video program like FinalCut or Premier.

Camtasia by TechSmith

Camtasia offers a similar feature set with the ability to record your screen, webcam and also offers a feature rich video and audio editor which allows you to export your content seamlessly. 

Free Solutions

Camstudio.org  is able to record all screen and audio activity on your computer and create industry-standard AVI video files.  Windows only.

Screencast-O-Matic is a  Java-based screencasting tool that requires no local software. Works on both Mac and Windows.

QuickTime is included with every modern Mac and allows you to do screen recordings without any additional software. If you want to edit your screencast or add audio you'll need additional editing software.

Sending your Microlearning

Once you've got your microlearnin videos set up, you need to send them out to your audience and track their performance.  Check out ExpandShare to see the easiest way to use your microlearning videos for refresher training or outbound learning.

 

 

All About Microlearning

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Microlearning is all about the small, and it appears that small is the next big thing.

Tiny bursts of elearning in video (or any other highly digestible media) is defined as microlearning, and it usually means that the short subject of the training can be learned in a very short period of time.  It's a completely different approach than long-form training or macrolearning. 

 

Here are the defnining characteristics of microlearning:

  • It's narrowly focused
  • It's presented in small chunks
  • It's designed to have a minimal time impact on the learner

All of the above make microlearning perfect for mobile.  It's also ideal for refresher training, and for training on the most important topics.  Why would you use microlearning for your most important topics?  Because you can keep these key topics front and center without infringing on your students' time.  You could hit them up every day with the same key topic if it's mission critical.

Microlearning, when done well, can have the same enagagement and impact level as advertsing.  Ads have a HUGE impact in a very short span of time. The car companies don't need 12 hours of online learning to explain why you should buy their car. These types of messages are carefully crafted to make their point quickly and impactfully (a disclipline sorely lacking in the eLearning space).

Many have claimed that microlearning is the natural outcome of the millenial generation and their short attention spans.  There's some truth to that.  But it's also true that humans digest information in short "chunks" natively. It's our natural way of understanding things. We actually can't comprehend long form training as well as we can these microbursts.

In fact, microlearning has been used for ages for memorization: flash cards, cliff notes, mnemonic devices are all examples.

And all of the many one or two minute single-subject videos on YouTube.  How to fix your faucet, etc.  These are microlearning for the modern age.

Of course, in this busy day and age, attention spans are shorter.  And that makes microlearning perfect for learning on your phone while you're on the train to work in the morning. Or just getting started with your day—especially when you know it's not going to take an hour of your time.

It's not likely that microlearning will replace long-form training.  In fact, just the opposite.  

With its natural tendencies toward isolated chunks of learning, micro-learning is not so great at providing a framework, or the big picture of the training material, and be able to connect disparate elements of it into one coherent picture.  

Microlearning is just another tool in the toolbox. It's really ideal for refresher training and follow up training.

And it's particularly good when it's active, not passive. What I mean is, when the eLearning is sent to the student as opposed to the student having to go seek it out.

Passive microlearning is great for topics where the user is highly motivated to research and discover the information (the YouTube broken faucet example).

But what if you are trying to push information out to a set of learners. Wouldn't it be great to be able to send it directly to their inbox or text them on their mobile phone?

In this new landscape, microlearning will be a wonderful new tool for modern eLearning, as it hits all the sweet spots:

– It’s short  and therefore engaging
– It's natural because it's the way humans learn
– It's mobile and can be done on-person anytime

Small is the next big thing!

Microlearning is all about the small, and it appears that small is the next big thing.

Tiny bursts of elearning in video (or any other highly digestible media) is defined as microlearning, and it usually means that the short subject of the training can be learned in a very short period of time.  It's a completely different approach than long-form training or macrolearning. 

 

Here are the defnining characteristics of microlearning:

  • It's narrowly focused
  • It's presented in small chunks
  • It's designed to have a minimal time impact on the learner

All of the above make microlearning perfect for mobile.  It's also ideal for refresher training, and for training on the most important topics.  Why would you use microlearning for your most important topics?  Because you can keep these key topics front and center without infringing on your students' time.  You could hit them up every day with the same key topic if it's mission critical.

Microlearning, when done well, can have the same enagagement and impact level as advertsing.  Ads have a HUGE impact in a very short span of time. The car companies don't need 12 hours of online learning to explain why you should buy their car. These types of messages are carefully crafted to make their point quickly and impactfully (a disclipline sorely lacking in the eLearning space).

Many have claimed that microlearning is the natural outcome of the millenial generation and their short attention spans.  There's some truth to that.  But it's also true that humans digest information in short "chunks" natively. It's our natural way of understanding things. We actually can't comprehend long form training as well as we can these microbursts.

In fact, microlearning has been used for ages for memorization: flash cards, cliff notes, mnemonic devices are all examples.

And all of the many one or two minute single-subject videos on YouTube.  How to fix your faucet, etc.  These are microlearning for the modern age.

Of course, in this busy day and age, attention spans are shorter.  And that makes microlearning perfect for learning on your phone while you're on the train to work in the morning. Or just getting started with your day—especially when you know it's not going to take an hour of your time.

It's not likely that microlearning will replace long-form training.  In fact, just the opposite.  

With its natural tendencies toward isolated chunks of learning, micro-learning is not so great at providing a framework, or the big picture of the training material, and be able to connect disparate elements of it into one coherent picture.  

Microlearning is just another tool in the toolbox. It's really ideal for refresher training and follow up training.

And it's particularly good when it's active, not passive. What I mean is, when the eLearning is sent to the student as opposed to the student having to go seek it out.

Passive microlearning is great for topics where the user is highly motivated to research and discover the information (the YouTube broken faucet example).

But what if you are trying to push information out to a set of learners. Wouldn't it be great to be able to send it directly to their inbox or text them on their mobile phone?

In this new landscape, microlearning will be a wonderful new tool for modern eLearning, as it hits all the sweet spots:

– It’s short  and therefore engaging
– It's natural because it's the way humans learn
– It's mobile and can be done on-person anytime

Small is the next big thing!

If you're interested, check out ExpandShare to see how your program can be an epic success.

 

5 Steps to Scripting Great Microlearning Videos

Video is used all over the place for educational content. You're going to find it one of the most effective media in your toolkit because it's engaging, multimedia and easy to do. You don't need to be a videographer or video expert to create great content.  In fact, your smartphone has pretty much everything you need. Video is great for m

 obile platforms as well—all smartphones support it. Major video sites like Wistia report that half of their viewers are mobile.

So, here are the steps to designing great video content.

Step 1: Be Focused

Make sure you have just ONE learning objective for your microlearning video.  You should be able to ask just a single assessment question to verify whether your learner has got it. Break things down into their most discrete chunks. 

For example, if you are using a microlearning video to retrain some restaurant employees on washing their hands, focus tightly on a small chunk of information. One of the best ways to do this is to start with the assessment question.

Let's say the main thing you want to teach is how long employees should wash their hands.  Here's the assessment

How long do you need to wash your hands before returning to work?

  1. 20 seconds
  2. 30 seconds
  3. 40 seconds

This makes the content you create in order to teach this object very easy to create. You are now focused on the "timing" part of the process.  

Step 2: Think in Pictures

It's easy to get caught up in scripting and voice over, but remember, this is video.  You need to show the user what you want them to learn. Reinforce that with text on screen and voice over, but the main avenue for training in video is motion. Show the process, the procedure, the information.

Here's an example

 

 

 

Step 3: Write it Down

Unless you are an improv artist, you'll want a script. Preferably one that includes the visual story as well as the dialogue or voice over. Keep it short, engaging and direct. With microlearning, you have time to tell a story, but it's a very short story.  

30 second advertising is a good place to look for inspiration—short ads are a form of micro marketing, if you will.  We can use the same sort of engagement techniques and micro storytelling that good TV advertising firms use.

Step 4: Delete the Fluff

If you're just trying to convey information, then avoid distractions.  Stick to your story and make it straight to the point. Your audience will appreciate the fact that you're not wasting their time with extraneous fluff.  So much of long-form elearning is wasted time.  Here's your opportunity to cut to the chase!

Step 5: Review and Test

Try your material out on a test audience. Have a couple of takes which you can take a look at later. Or better yet, use a sample group of your audience to see which content is more effective at reaching your learning objective. A good microlearning system will have analytics which you can track and use to verify competency before and after.

So, there they are, five steps to great video microlearning 

  • Focus on a single objective
  • Think visually
  • Script it out
  • Delete any fluff
  • Test and Review

If you're interested, check out ExpandShare's eLearning Services to see how your program can be an epic success.

The Compelling Case to Connect Learning to Organizational Performance

Organizations have the power to determine whether training programs have the impact they’re supposed to, but the majority of them still rely on outdated measures of lesser value. In this post, we’ll discuss why it’s so important to measure a learning program’s impact on performance, why it can be hard, and some tips for getting started.

Connecting Learning and Performance...What Does That Mean, Exactly?

Training followed a typical path for a long time. When someone is new to an organization, they learn about the mission, the importance of their role, and how to perform it correctly. As they mature in their role, additional training may be provided as circumstances warrant; new software, systems, techniques or protocols are all common drivers of training.

This approach to training is based more on what we think people should be trained on, rather than what individual and organizational performance data is telling us. L&D is experiencing a shift to include more of the latter: looking at results to tell us where and what kind of training is needed.

Slow Adoption of Data-Driven Learning Strategy

Brandon Hall Group’s (BHG) recent webinars and articles have focused on the need for organizations to connect the learning function to business performance, and the rather surprising number of organizations that still aren’t doing it.

We’re excited to see this topic brought to the forefront by an industry leader and think tank, because it’s one we’ve focused on for several years in the development of ourlearning management software, ExpandShare. It’s a passion of mine.

We want to share some of BHG’s findings from the recent The State of Learning & Development research report, as discussed during a November, 2015 webinar:

  1. Researchers separated “high performing organizations” from the overall group of respondents and found an interesting trend. High Performing Organizations,  as defined by BHG researchers, had a year-over-year increase in key performance indicators. Experiencing growth in areas like revenue, customer satisfaction, and market share, these organizations are also more likely to employ today’s learning and development best practices.
    • They are more likely to build a learning strategy to guide activities.
    • They are more likely to base learning strategy on organizational performance goals.
    • They are more likely to use advanced measurement types beyond Kirkpatrick’s Level 1 to determine the impact of learning activities and strategy.
  2. When asked about connecting the learning function to business performance, the results were, again, quite telling:
    • Just over 80% of high performing organizations indicated they’ve tied L&D to business outcomes to a “moderate or high degree”.
    • That number dropped to about 65% for all respondents.
  3. When asked why learning and performance should be connected, survey respondents offered the reasons listed below. Note the primary focus is ensuring the training department delivers what is most needed by the business to drive success.
    • “To align learning strategy with business needs” (65.3% of all respondents)
    • “To develop strategies for addressing L&D needs” (33.3% of all respondents)
    • “Analyze L&D needs” (33.1%)
    • “Promote strong financial management” (24.5%)
    • “Strengthen ethics and government” (22.1%)
    • “Evaluate L&D” (17.4%)
  4. Respondents were also asked about how they measure learning programs. About 50% of survey respondents claimed they measure the majority (75-100%) of their learning programs at Kirkpatrick Level 1 - Satisfaction. 40% are measuring none of their learning programs at Level 4 - Results. Let that one simmer for a minute. Assuming respondents are a representative sample, 40% of organizations have no way of knowing whether their training programs have any impact on business results, and they’re not even attempting to find out.
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Look For Meaningful Data to Inform and Guide Your Learning Strategy

Marketers have been through what L&D departments are going through now. For a long time, many marketing tactics weren’t very measurable, and if they were it wasn’t terribly meaningful information. The number of people who could potentially have your television ad broadcast in their home isn’t super helpful. It was hard to determine an ROI. Digital marketing, big data, and platforms that power entire marketing strategies, like Marketo and HubSpot, have allowed marketers to track all kinds of metrics and make swift tactical adjustments to maximize results.

Similarly, training departments have relied on “smile sheets” and quizzes to gauge the success of a course. While interesting, these measures aren’t terribly meaningful. Just because someone says they enjoyed a course doesn’t mean they will perform better at their job. Just because they score 100% on a quiz doesn’t mean they will have retained that information a month down the line.

Training departments need data to tell them whether training activities are impacting on-the-job performance and moving the needle. The figure below lists some of the KPIs Brandon Hall’s survey respondents indicated were good measures of success. Some others may be:

  • Increase in Sales
  • Point-of-Sale Behavior
  • Equipment downtime
  • Problem Resolution
  • Customer Complaints
  • Inspection Results
  • And more, depending on your organization’s unique KPIs

Brandon Hall Group: The State of L&D: Trends in Learning Technology, Strategy, and More (2015)

Why Isn’t Everyone Measuring the Impact of Learning Programs?

Talking to folks at organizations of all shapes and sizes, we hear a lot of the same challenges when it comes to implementing these practices. In short, it’s hard. If it weren’t, everyone would be doing it by now.

  • It often requires pulling data from multiple systems within the organization, and that’s not always a piece of cake. It requires buy-in from the necessary departments and, of course, the IT work to import or export relevant data.
  • You may find you need another platform or external resource that’s a difficult sell internally.
  • If your internal analytics team is already swamped, getting help crunching data can be tough.

While Not Always Easy, It’s Worth It

Armed with the right results-oriented information, L&D teams have the ability to createneeded learning programs and deliver them to the right people at the right time. They will know how much their work contributes to the meeting of organizational goals.

But What If Our Training Programs Aren’t Making An Impact?

This isn’t something you should worry about. First, that’s highly unlikely. Second, even if you start taking a deeper look at the impact of training and don’t like what you see, the data will also help you design an improvement plan. It will make your job easier, not harder.

 

If you're interested, check out ExpandShare's eLearning Services to see how your program can be an epic success.